Below is a brief overview of the different classes and attached is the complete guide with an occupation breakdown.


OCCUPATION GUIDE BASICS
The occupation class is based on the actual duties performed and is affected by factors such as:

  • Environmental hazards
  • Claims experience
  • Stability and motivation
  • Education and training


The occupation class determines:

  • Plan, benefit period, optional benefit and rideravailability
  • Own occupation period
  • Premium rate


To determine the proper occupation class:

  • Obtain a detailed description of the actual duties performed. Job title alone is not sufficient.
  • Obtain the percentage of time actually spent performing professional, managerial, and administrative duties vs. trade, services, or manual labor duties.
  • Match the percentage breakdown of actual duties performed to the most appropriate occupation class category listed below. Individual circumstances will vary and the Underwriting Department has final approval authority based on the available information.


CLASS DEFINITIONS

Class 5
Occupations where the duties are limited to administrative, professional, managerial and clerical with no manual labor or service demands and minimal physical dexterity demands. Typically, advanced or specialized education, training, or experience is required. Examples include accountants, actuaries, bookkeepers, computer analysts, draftsmen, and secretaries.


Class 4
Occupations where the duties include professional and specialized technical functions that may require physical dexterity with little or no manual labor or services*. Typically, advanced or specialized education, training or experience is required. Examples include surgeons, dentists and  CRNAs. * “Little or no manual labor or services” means no more than 10% of the time performing manual labor or services not to exceed 4 hours in any given workweek where at least 3 full-time employees or at least 5 subcontractors performing manual labor or services are directly supervised or managed by the Proposed Insured.


Class 3
Occupations where the duties include professional, semi-professional, supervisory or technical functions that may require on-site supervision, moderate physical dexterity with little or no manual labor or services*. Typically, specialized training or experience is required. Examples include cashiers, dental hygienists, medical technicians and on-site supervisors.


Class 2
Occupations where the duties include semiprofessional, skilled trade or technical functions that may require continual physical dexterity and  manual labor or services. Specialized training or skills are required. Examples include carpenters, electricians, farmers, mechanics, plumbers, cosmetologists and truck drivers.


Class 1
Occupations where the duties include technical or trade functions that may require heavy manual labor or services, continual physical dexterity and hazardous environmental exposure. Basic skills or training is required. Typically, longer periods of recuperation from disability are required.  Examples include chiropractors, factory laborers, firemen, policemen, roofers and carpet layers.


NI = Not Insurable
Occupations considered uninsurable for disability income coverage based on duties that may require severe environmental hazard exposure, and may involve extraordinary psychological stressors, extreme physical dexterity and excessive manual labor or services. Examples include air traffic controllers, pilots, linemen and iron workers.